Posted in blogging, Crafting Corner

9 Practical Tips To Help You Overcome Writer’s Block

This post contains affiliate links which means that I may receive a small fee, at no additional cost to you, when you purchase items using the links provided. As an Amazon associate I  earn from qualifying purchases.

Have you ever suffered from a case of writer‘s block? You keep pounding away at the keys hoping that a topic will come to mind. You keep writing and writing the same post over and over again, but you just can’t seem to get it right.

I think we’ve all been there. Whether you are a blogger, author or a student writing a paper for English class, writer’s block doesn’t discriminate.

 It seems like the more you try to write the more frustrated you become. The good thing is that there are a few simple tricks to help you overcome writer’s block.

1. Walk Away

If you’ve been working on a blog post a few hours or days and aren’t getting anywhere your best bet is to walk away  for a little while. 

Get up from the computer and continue on with the rest of your day. Who knows maybe inspiration will strike you while your out grocery shopping. 

2. Exercise

Get out the house and walk around the neighborhood or go to the gym an do a quick workout. The exercise will get your blood pumping and release endorphins that can help boost your mood.

3. Change Locations

Sometimes you just need to change your surrounding to find inspiration. If you’ve been working in the house all day take your computer and go outside or go to a cafe.

4. Listen to Music

When I was in college I did my best work when I was listening to music. I would just put on my headphones, crank up the volume and just zone out. It was just me, my tunes and whatever it was I was studying that night.

5. Read A Book

Take a few minutes and sit down with your favorite book. Get lost in the story for a little while. 

6. Coloring

Coloring isn’t just for kids anymore. It is a great way to relieve stress and get your creative”juices” flowing again. Don’t worry they have coloring books for adults.

7. Play

Step away from whatever it is your writing and take some time to play. Whether you play with your kids, play a video game, or a card game. Go out and have some fun for a little bit.

8. Take a Shower/ Bath

Sometimes the best ideas come when you’re relaxing in the shower or tub. In my opinion there is nothing better than a hot shower to calm your mind.

9. Eat a Snack

Thinking uses a lot of energy. Take a time out and refuel your brain with a healthy snack.

Final Thoughts

Writer’s block can cause you to become stressed and unable to think.  When you get frustrated take time to step away from the computer and relax. It will help you refocus and get you back on the right track. 

Do you have a special technique that you use to overcome writer’s block? I’d love to hear it. Please feel free to share it in the comment section.

Don’t forget to like and share this post to social media. If you haven’t already, subscribe to my e-mail list.

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Until Next Time,

The Crafty Afro

To My Followers

As many of you know I started blogging almost 9 months ago. Wow, it doesn’t seem like it was that long ago.

I must say that blogging has been a very eye opening and fun experience.

It has allowed me to express myself in a way that I would have never thought possible 9 months ago.

I realize that I still have a lot to learn and a long way to go as a blogger. I just wanted to share with you guys that we’ve finally hit the over 50 (55 to be exact) follower mark!

For those of you that have been blogging for awhile I’m sure this number may seem trivial, but we must learn to appreciate the small things in life.

As I continue to learn more about blogging and become more serious about it I’m sure my numbers will continue to grow.

To all of my current followers I just want to say a huge, “Thank You!” for following me.

Photo by rawpixel.com on Pexels.com

I hope you will continue to follow me on this blogging journey. I am forever grateful to you all!

Until Next Time,

The Crafty Afro

Posted in Crafting Corner, diy, sewing

Super Simple Zipper Pouch Sewing Tutorial for Beginners

stack of zippered pouches with a pink rose

Make up bags. Pencil pouches. Coin purse. Mom first aid kit. What do all these things have in common? Simply put they are all just different variations of a zippered pouch. 

I first started making zippered pouches because I wanted to learn how to sew a zipper. And creating a zippered pouch is a fairly simple and straight forward way to get practice sewing zippers.

I’m relatively new to sewing so I was very excited when I made my first one and it came out better than I could imagine.

It wasn’t too long before I started making all kinds of pouches! You can use them for just about anything and everything.

You need a pouch to carry your essential oils? Pow! Zippered pouch to the rescue!

Your kid has a bunch of small tools laying around house? I got a zippered pouch to put those suckers in!

Another thing that’s great about making your own zippered pouches is that you can make them a small or as large as you want. It’s a very versatile project. 

On top of that they are fairly inexpensive to make. I think I spent about $3 to make the pouch I used for this tutorial.

 As you can tell I’m pretty excited about making zippered pouches. I’m also excited to share with you this easy photo tutorial that I’ve put together to help you make a simple zippered pouch. 

I’m sure once you’ve made your first one you’ll be making many more! So without further ado, let’s get started!

Materials

This post contains affiliate links which means that I may receive a small fee, at no additional cost to you, when you purchase items using the links provided. As an Amazon associate I  earn from qualifying purchases.

Important Sewing terms

  • Zipper foot- type of presser foot that is used to attach zippers.
  • Right Side (rs)- The pretty side of the fabric
  • Wrong Side (wr)- The plain side of the fabric
  • Top stitch- stitches placed on the right side of the fabric for decorative purposes
  • Seam allowance- area between the fabric edge and the line you stitch

Tutorial

1.Prep Materials

Before you start sewing you will want to do the following things:

  • Iron fabric to get out all of the wrinkles. Make sure you iron your fabric on the appropriate setting.
  • Attach your zipper foot to your machine.
  • Thread your bobbin with your coordinating thread colors and thread your machine. Change your needle if you have already used it few times. If you are using thick fabric you may want to use a bigger needle. Check your manual to ensure you are using the proper size needle for the fabric you will be using. 

2. Cut Your Fabric

  • Cut  two 8.5 in x 7.5 in rectangles from your lining fabric and your outer fabric. You should have four rectangles (2 lining and 2 outer fabric pieces). I can’t cut a straight line with scissors to save my life, instead I use the rotary cutter set that my husband brought for me. It’s made my life much easier.

 Tip: If you are using a different size zipper you will want to cut your fabric the same length as your zipper. If you brought a 9 in zipper add 1.5 inches to the length of your fabric.  The 9 inches doesn’t include the material at the end of the zipper. 

3.  Zipper Sandwich

This is one of the most important steps of the process. Take your time and make sure everything is lined up correctly and facing the right direction.

  • Place the lining fabric right side (rs) up on the table.
  • Lining fabric is placed rs up.
  • Place the zipper right side up on top of the lining fabric, line the zipper up with the top edge of the lining fabric.
    Zipper is lined up with lining fabric.
  • Place the outer fabric right side down on top of the zipper and line up the edges.
  • Pin or clip the edges together. (I prefer to use clips because they are easier to manipulate than sewing pins. I brought a pack of cheap binder clips from Walmart for .88, but they have nicersewing clips that you can use.)
    All the pieces clipped together.

    Now you have a zipper sandwich! Well at least one half of it. 🙂

Tip: Before you start sewing take a piece of scrap fabric and sew a few stitches. Check to make sure your tension and stitch length are correct. The thicker the fabric the longer the stitches should be. 

4. Sewing The Pieces Together

Slowly sew everything together.
  • Place your zipper sandwich on your sewing machine  and sew a straight line down the length of the zipper.  Make sure to remove the pin/clips as you sew. Cut your threads.
    Completed zipper sandwich.

Tips: Before you get to the zipper tab,stop sewing and back stitch. Take your fabric off the machine and unzip the zipper. (Or you can leave the needle in the fabric and unzip the zipper. ) Place your fabric back on the machine and continue sewing from where you left off. 

Unzip the zipper and keep sewing.

5. Create Another Zipper Sandwich & 6. Sew The Pieces Together

At this point you should have one side of the pouch attached to the zipper. You are going to repeat steps 3 and 4. 

Completed zipper sandwich.

Lining fabric is rs up.
  • Place the lining fabric rs up and line the zipper up with the fabric.
Rs of the outer fabric should be facing each other.

Place outer fabric rs down on top of zipper. Line everything up and pin/clip in place. Sew it together.

Your finished product should look like this:

7. Press Your Fabric

  • Press your fabric. Make sure that you are pressing away from the zipper on each side.

Note: If you are using a metal zipper be very careful because the teeth will get hot and burn you. 

  • Press fabric away from the zipper.

8. Top stitching

  • Take your fabric back to the machine and place a straight top stitch on each side of the zipper.
    Top stitch on both sides of the zipper.

9. Match Up Sides

  • Fold the fabric so that the right sides of the fabric are facing each other. Do the same thing with the outer fabric. Pin or clip the sides together.
  • Fold the ends of the zipper so that they are facing the lining of the fabric and pin/clip each side together.  Unzip the zipper halfway before clipping both ends together.

*All you should see at this point are the wrong sides of the fabric. 

All clipped together.

10. Sew It Together

  • Starting at the top  middle of the lining fabric using a .5 in seam allowance sew around the perimeter of the fabric.
    Sew along the perimeter with .5 in seam allowance
  • You will need to leave a gap at the top of the lining fabric large enough to stick your hand through.  DO NOT  SEW CLOSED.
    3 finger width gap in fabric

 Tips:

  • go slow when you get to the zipper area you may need to use the hand wheel to sew through this area because it will be thicker than the rest of the fabric. You do not want to hit the metal part of the zipper. 
  • Leave your needle in the fabric when you are turning the corners. 

11. Trim

  • Trim off the excess fabric and an excess bulk from the zipper area. Be careful not to cut the thread. Also trim all loose threads if you haven’t already.

Tip- cut your corners at an angle, this will help when you have to turn the bag right side out. 

Clip the edges at an angle

12. Time To Flip Out (The Fun Part)

  • Put your hand inside the hole you left in the lining fabric and gently pull the outer fabric through the zipper. You may need to unzip the zipper more to flip the bag completely out.

Pulling the outer fabric through.

Viola! You have a cute little zippered bag to use however you wish! But before we can use it we have to do one more thing.

Completed zipper pouch

If you did not place your fabric right when making the zipper fabric your bag will look like this:

Outer fabric is showing the ws of the fabric.

13. Sew the Lining Closed

  • Tuck the raw edges of the lining fabric together and sew it shut either by hand or using your sewing machine.

14. Finishing touches

  • Using a pencil or another blunt object push out the corners of your bag.
  • Zip the top closed and press your bag to give it that professional touch. 
Finished product.

Congratulations you have made your first zippered pouch! These are great to give as gifts and are pretty easy to put together once you get the hang of it.Not to mention there are so many other different bag styles that you can make once you get the basics down.

If you have any questions or need clarification please don’t hesitate to leave me a message in the comments area.

If you found this tutorial helpful please feel free to share it. I hop you enjoy making many more pouches!

Until next time,

The Crafty Afro

Posted in Crafting Corner

How To Design and Create Your Own Crochet Patterns For Beginners

Have you ever wondered how the people on sites like Ravelry and Etsy come up with those awesome crochet patterns? Have you ever wanted to try your hand at creating your own crochet patterns to sell or to list for free?

Honestly, if you’re interested in making money in the crochet world making and selling your own patterns is the way to go.

As a beginner crocheter, you may not feel like you how the skills to create your own crochet designs and write your own patterns.

But I’m here to tell you that if you have the basic crochet skills down, then you have what it takes to design and write your own crochet patterns.

So let’s get to it.

The Design Process

Find Inspiration

The first thing that you need to do is figure out what it is you want to create. If you are new to crochet or you don’t know many of the advanced crochet stitches I would start with something easy.

Some of the best and easiest crochet items for beginners are:

  • Dishcloths & Hand towels
  • Scarves
  • Baby blankets
  • Coffee Cozies
  • Headbands
  • Boot cuffs
  • Pillows
  • Coasters and
  • Hair Bows

If you are a little more advanced or want to challenge your skills you could try designing your own garments, purses or stuffed animals (amigurumi).

For example, a few months ago I attempted to crochet a replica of one of my favorite shirts that had become… shall we say a bit too small and had a little run-in with some bleach.

I’ve crocheted a cardigan before so I figured why not try to make my own sweater. That project was the inspiration for this blog post.

Start with the basics

Now, that you have decided what item you want to make you need to ask yourself a few basic questions.

1. What kind of stitches will you use?

I would suggest you start making something using a combination of the basic crochet stitches.

Basic Crochet Stitches:

  • Single crochet
  • Half double crochet
  • Double crochet
  • Treble crochet

These stitches can be used in combination to make interesting patterns and textures or you can use just one specific stitch. It just depends on the look you are going for.

Other ways you can add texture to your work are by using the following types of stitches:

  • Stitching in the front or back loops only (ribbed effect)
  • Shell stitches
  • V stitches
  • Post stitches

Remember you can use any combination of stitches that you want in your design.

Just make sure it is something that you are comfortable with and something that you can explain to somebody else.

To create a crocheted replica of the sweater I used single and double crochet stitches.

I used single crochet stitches at the base and the rest was made using double crochet stitches and single stitches for the border.

2. Are there any special skills you need to complete your work?

As a beginner, you might not know many of the advanced stitches, but don’t let that stop you.

However, there are still some basic skills that you need to make sure you freshen up on before you start creating your work.

For instance, will you be using one color or will you be using multiple colors? If you are using multiple colors you will need to make sure that you know how to change colors.

If you are going for a ribbed look, do you know the difference between the front loop and the back loops?

When you get to the end of your row how many chains do you need to do create before you turn the work so that your stitches are the same height?

To an experienced crocheter these may not seem like special skills, but if you’re a novice they are skills that are essential to your success as a designer and a pattern maker.

When I decided to create a crocheted replica of my shirt I had to know how to change colors, how to increase and decrease stitches and how to sew the two panels together.

All of these are basic skills, but I usually make blankets or scarves, which usually don’t require you to increase or decrease stitches nor do they require you to sew two pieces together.

3. What type of yarn will you need?

The next piece of information you will need is what type of yarn will you use? If you are making a dishcloth you will want to use something absorbent like cotton yarn.

If you are making a blanket or scarf acrylic or wool yarn would work just fine.

Most crocheted items are used making size 4 yarn. But maybe you want something super warm and squishy, then a bulky or super bulky yarn would work best.

If your making something a little more dainty and lacy then a size 3 or lower yarn would be the best option for your project.

5. What’s the size?

The final question that we need to ask ourselves is how big do we want our project to be.

For items like dish clothes, scarves and even baby blankets size is not that big of a deal. However, if you are concerned you can always look up what the average size of these items are.

Knowing the size of your item is important for making things like sweaters, hats, etc.

All bodies are not created equal and having correct measurements is a must when making any type of garment.

This information will also give you a rough estimate of how much yarn you will need to buy to complete your project.

Write Down Everything

Once you’ve gotten the basics figured out now it’s time for the fun part. Creating your masterpiece!

I assume you are reading this blog post because you want other people to be able to make your marvelous new creation.

If you want to be able to share your pattern with the rest of the world you will need to write down EVERYTHING.

If you took measurements. Write it down. If you changed colors in the middle of row 11 on stitch 22. Write it down.

If you don’t count the turning chain as a stitch. Write it down.

Whatever you do from this point on make sure you write it down. It doesn’t have to be neat, but it does need to be written down somewhere.

I can’t tell you how many scarves or blankets that I’ve created that I wish I had written down what I had done.

If you don’t write down what you are doing you will forget what you did by the time you are finished.

As you can see from my diagram. I wrote down everything I did and the measurements that I took on one sheet of paper.

It is important to note that in this phase, you will probably start over many times. But keep working at it until it turns out the way you want it too.

The crocheted sweater I made came out the way I wanted to, as far as the way it looks. But after making it and trying it on I realized that the yarn I had used was too bulky and stiff.

So I’ll have to try it again with a thinner yarn. But it wasn’t a total loss. I could rework the pattern and take out the increase to make it a “normal” fitting sweater.

This step will also make writing your final pattern easier, we’ll talk about that in the next section.

Will You Need a Gauge Swatch?

At some point you may want to create a gauge swatch for your pattern. If you are making a sweater, hat, cardigan etc these are very important and need to be included in your pattern.

This will help the person reading your pattern determine what size hook and tension they will need to use to get the same look and dimensions of your finished work.

Gauge swatches are usually a 4x4in square and include the type of stitch, the number of stitches it took to get 4 inches wide and the number of rows it took to get 4 inches in height.

Example Gauge Swatch: 10hdc and 4 rows created a 4×4 in square using a size M hook (the hook size is mentioned in the supplies section of the pattern).

Depending on how tightly or loosely the person reading your pattern crochets will determine if they can use the same hook size or if they will need to go up or down a hook size.

Writing the Pattern

If you remembered to write down everything you did during the design process. Then this part will be relatively easy.

All you have to do is transfer what you wrote down into a standard crochet pattern format.

Use Standard Crochet Terminology & Abbreviations

Before you begin writing your pattern you will need to become familiar with the basic terminology and abbreviations used in crochet patterns

Depending on what part of the world you live in some of the terms and abbreviations are not the same. For example, in the UK a single crochet is called a double crochet.

When I first started crocheting I didn’t know that the names for stitches and hook size were different. The first time I tried to follow a pattern written by someone in the UK I was thoroughly confused.

Here are a few of the basic abbreviations and terms used in the US and the UK when writing crochet patterns.

Common Crochet Pattern Terms and Abbreviations (US & UK)

Us Term

US Abbreviation

UK Term

UK Abbreviation

Chain

ch.

Chain

ch

Single Chain

sc

Double crochet

dc

Half Double Crochet

hdc

Half Treble Crochet

htr

Double Crochet

dc

Treble Crochet

tr

Treble Crochet

tr

Double Treble Crochet

dtr

Slip Stitch

ss or sl

Slip stitch

ss or sl

Yarn Over

yo

Yarn Over

yo

Explain Any Special Stitches Used

If you used a special stitch or technique that might not be familiar to the person reading your pattern you will need to provide an explanation of this stitches for your readers.

You can provide this information at the beginning of your pattern or you can explain it in the pattern.

If it’s something that is going to be done frequently or is a major part of the design I would explain it at the beginning of your pattern.

For example if you used a cluster stitch in your pattern in the section for special stitches you would explain how to do a cluster stitch. It would look something like this:

Cluster stitch (cl): yo, insert hook, yo, draw loop through, yo, draw through 2 loops over 3 stitches, yo and draw through all loops on the hook.

You could explain it again in the pattern if you think it will be easier for the reader to understand in the context of the pattern.

Basic Crochet Pattern Outline

Hopefully, you took excellent notes during the design phase. If you did, writing your crochet pattern will be a breeze.

Now that we’ve covered the basics I’m going to provide you with an outline to use to write your pattern. You can also download my free crochet pattern template here as an editable word document.

Basic Crochet Pattern Outline

Title:

Materials Needed: {yarn used (include size,color, and brand), hook sizes, scissors, needle, etc go here in bulleted form)

Gauge: (if needed)

4×4 in gauge square: 11 hdc wide and 4 rows

Special Stitches: (if needed)

Finished measurements:

Skill level( is this pattern suitable for beginners,intermediate, or advanced skill levels)

Pattern

Ch. 36 (always start with the number of single crochets used in the starting chain) This does not count as a row.

Row 1: insert hook into 2nd ch from the hook, sc in each stitch (35) ← this number indicates the total number of stitches at the end of row 1. If you are not adding or removing stitches then this number isn’t necessary at the end. Ch 1 and turn. Indicate how many stitches are in the turning chain

Row 2: sc in 2nd ch from the hook and across the rest of the chain, ch 1 and turn (35)

Row 3: repeat row 1. Ch 2 and turn (35)

*If you have repeating rows you do not have to keep writing the same thing over and over again. Simply write row 3-row 5: repeat row 2.

If your super lazy like I tend to be sometimes you can just right R instead of row.

R 4: 2 dc in 1st ch from the hook, dc across, 2 dc in the last stitch, ch 2 and turn (37)

R5-R17: repeat R4 (57)

Cut yarn, tie off, and weave in any loose ends.

Optional Information

At the end of the pattern you can include any other information you would like.

Some designers indicate whether people are allowed to create and sell the items they made from this pattern as long as they give credit to the author in this section.

If your handy with a camera you could create a tutorial and insert the video or link here.

Now to our final and most important step before you hit that publish button!

Test Your Pattern

The last thing you want to do before you submit your crochet pattern to the world wide web is to test your pattern.

You can either find a friend to test your pattern or you can set it aside for a few days and come back to the pattern and try to make it again yourself.

If you do this part it’s important that you follow the pattern as you have written it. If you notice any mistakes or can’t figure out what to do next, chances are neither will a complete stranger on the internet.

The best thing you can do is take notes on what went right and what went wrong. Then you will have to go back and tweak your pattern.

If you can get somebody else to test your pattern that’s even better. Make sure you ask them to leave you feedback.

Final Thoughts

I hope you found this post helpful and informative.If you create and design your own pattern please share your success with me. I’d love to hear and see all the wonderful things you have made.

I would not consider myself a pro at crocheting so if there is something I’ve missed or you have any questions please feel free to contact me or leave a comment.

Once again if you would like the free crochet pattern template you can download it here.

If you thought this post was awesome please share it or save it on Pinterest.

Until Next Time,

The Crafty Afro

Posted in blogging

What I’ve Learned After 6 Months of Blogging

Hi everyone! Can you believe that it has been six months since I started blogging? I can’t believe that time has flown by so quickly. Honestly, by now I thought I would have thrown in the towel on blogging.

But as a SAHM blogging has been an escape for me and a way to reconnect to the real world. So here I am 6 months into this blogging thing.

If you haven’t read my previous post on the 4 things I learned my first-month blogging you can check that out here.

I’ll do my best not to recap anything I shared in that first post. So without further ado. Here is what I learned after six months of blogging.

Blog Because You Like It

Photo by Martine Savard on Pexels.com

I know the internet would have you believe that blogging is one of the best ways to make money on the internet.

It would also lead you to believe that it’s easy and that anyone can do it. Unfortunately, those claims are not true for most bloggers.

It is very rare for someone to build a following of thousands of followers in the first few months of blogging. At this moment after six months of blogging, I only have 33 followers.

And that’s OK because I didn’t get into blogging to make money. I started blogging as a way to express myself and share my thoughts with the world.

Would I eventually like to be able to make money from my blog? Yes. As a SAHM I would love to have a successful source of passive income.

But if it never happens, I’ll still continue to blog because for me it’s a source of escape from the crazy life that is being a stay at home parent.

If you’re not blogging because you like it. You will eventually find yourself burnt out, stressed out and disillusioned as a new blogger.

Be Consistent

Photo by Black ice on Pexels.com

When I first started blogging I was very inconsistent with my blog posts and what I was posting.

For instance my blog is about faith, family, and my craft corner. However, if you look at the number of post I have made, there are more post in my Craft Corner section, than in my other categories.

Some of those 33 people followed my blog based on posts that were made in the faith and family categories.

If that is the case then I owe it to my readers to post something in each of those categories on a consistent basis.

Many blogging experts will tell you that you need to blog every day to gain followers and to be found on the internet.

I tried that for a little while, but for me, it just didn’t work. So at the beginning of the new year, I made it a goal to write 1 blog post for each category once a month.

That boils down to one blog post a week and the fourth week I have free to do whatever I want with my blog such as: making pins for Pinterest, responding to comments, customizing my page, doing research on an upcoming topic, or planning for next months posts.

So far it has worked out well for me and I hope to develop a well round blog.

Share/Comment On Other Bloggers Posts

Photo by rawpixel.com on Pexels.com

In the world of blogging, you do not have to go it alone. Find other bloggers who are blogging about the topics that you are interested in. Don’t be afraid to comment on or share other bloggers posts with your audience.

In my experience, many of the other bloggers in the community are pretty nice and are willing to lend a helping hand.

Commenting on another bloggers post and sharing links are also ways to build your following.

However, I would suggest that if you’re going to make comments or share links do it because you genuinely have something to say about what was written or think that information will be valuable to your readers.

Blogging and bloggers are about building a community to help and support each other. Nobody likes to be taken advantage of for their own selfish gain.

So be a productive part of the blogging community.

Take Advantage of the Freebies

Photo by Pixabay on Pexels.com

There can be a steep learning curve when it comes to blogging and learning how to manage your site and growing your following.

WordPress has a lot of wonderful tutorials that can help you become a better blogger and learn how to take your blog to the next level.

If you started your blog on wordpress.com you should have taken the Blogging University Course: Learning Fundamentals. However, those are not the only course on Blogging University.

There are courses on branding & growth, photography, and writing. All at no cost to you.

If you’re looking for amazing pictures to put on your post you can find a list of 21 free photosites here. 

If you need to create awesome graphics for your site try Canva for free. You can make Facebook, Instagram, and Pinterest graphics that you can add to your blog or social media platforms.

I’ve heard that there are free web hosting sites, but I don’t have any experience with any of these sites.

But if you are looking to give self-hosting your blog a shot then you may want to take a look at a few of those free hosting services.

Be Yourself

Photo by rawpixel.com on Pexels.com

The last thing that I’ve learned in the my six months of blogging is to be true to yourself.

Yes, there may be 1,000’s of blogs on your topic, but on thing remains true there is only one you.

There are people out there that will resonate with your voice and your personality. So don’t try to pretend to write like or be like someone else.

Just be yourself and let your personality shine through your blog.

I hope you found this post enlightening and encouraging. Always feel free to leave a comment. Thanks for stopping by.

Until Next Time,

The Crafty Afro